AGROTAIN International Unveils $20 Million Production and Urea Cen

AGROTAIN International, LLC, along with parent company Lange-Stegmann, today celebrated the grand opening of its $20 million expansion project, including a granulation production facility, the Stabilized Nitrogen Center; and urea storage warehouse, the St. Louis Urea Center. The two facilities mark the country’s first urea plant using phase modification and the nation’s largest inland urea import terminal.

“High fertilizer prices are driving growers to evaluate their nutrient management programs,” said Mike Stegmann, president of Lange-Stegmann. This search for efficiency has created unprecedented demand for Stabilized Nitrogen Technology and this is the primary driver behind our investment in this new production facility. Located adjacent to the Urea Center, this new plant will use imported urea as a feedstock and transform it into SUPERU and other products to ensure a reliable supply of stabilized nitrogen fertilizers to both domestic and international markets.”

Built to fulfill the surging demand for Stabilized Nitrogen fertilizers, production capacity of the Stabilized Nitrogen Center is expected to be 125,000 tons annually. The facility uses a falling curtain granulation process for enhanced quality control and production efficiency. This process allows finished products to be manufactured to a specific size with unsurpassed consistency.

Completed construction also includes the St. Louis Urea Center, which adds 63,000 tons of fertilizer storage to Lange-Stegmann’s existing space. The new Urea Center will increase product handling capacity up to one million tons of imported urea per year.

Strategically located on the northernmost portion of the Mississippi River that remains lock- and ice-free, the facility ensures year-round access to and from the country’s agricultural heartland by road, rail and river transport.

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