Lynn Betts

Lynn
Betts
Articles
Accurate weather improves decisions
John Verell can read current weather conditions from all his weather stations on his cell phone. It allows him to know exactly how much a surprise rain shower can drop in a small amount of time.
No-till beats tight clay soils
Growing one midwestern farm is not about growing acre wise or horizontally. It means growing the soil to gain more yields.
Layer residual herbicides
Farmers may need to consider a change in the amount of herbicide they apply or layer to fight waterhemp emergence.
Interseed learning curve
An Iowa farmer is experimenting with interseeding cover crops into almost knee-high corn.
Recalculate premix herbicide rates
Resistant weed issues could increase with incorrect active ingredient rates inside premix herbicides.
The case for strip till: Healthy soil, less tile, better root growth 3

After 11 years of strip till, Dennis Smith has built his night crawler numbers up to the point that there’s not enough soybean residue to go around. He also doesn't need to tile or use grass waterways because of better water infiltration.

Cropping system changes may mean reduced nitrates 1
Conventional wisdom has been that increased corn acres and more use of nitrogen fertilizer translates to increased nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in downstream waters. But a recent analysis of water sampling and crop management databases indicates otherwise.
Corn and soybean producers find retailer who supports sustainable farming 1
Program centers on using data to use less nitrogen which results in cutting greenhouse gas emissions and improving water quality.
Farmers apply science to optimize nitrogen on corn 1
“First, I was surprised that Adapt-N and our Soil Scan 360 testing found so much of the 150 to 160 pounds of N applied in the spring could be lost by the summer. And then I was surprised that when we added 50 pounds of N per acre by plane in June, there was a 30 bushel per acre yield increase.” -- Brent Hall, agronomy manager, South Central Co-op, Lacona, Iowa
2016 Conservation Legacy Awards: Conservation is a family tradition

Three generations of Winsors have been working since the 1940s to sustain soil and water resources on the family farm in northeastern Kansas. “Having those practices in place allows my brother and I to implement newer conservation techniques, such as water management and cover crops," says Andy Winsor.

2016 Conservation Legacy Awards: Sustainable, cost-effective system

About 10 years ago, John Verell transitioned from cotton to corn, wheat and double-cropped soybeans, made no-till a priority and began to use cover crops. “Erosion just isn’t an issue any more,” this year’s Conservation Legacy Award winner for the South Region says.

2016 Conservation Legacy Awards: A never-till mindset

Cory Atkins has a “never-till” mindset. The southwest Delaware farmer is 100 percent no-till on all his corn, soybeans and wheat, and moving closer to that on his vegetable crops.

Manage tile drainage water

Nitrate management in tile water is a big reason why this water control structure has slowly gained a foothold in the Corn Belt, but its potential for providing timely water to corn and soybeans may spell the future for this underground tile water management tool.

Going all-in on cover crops 1

Some farmers want to try a new idea on a few acres to evaluate it before using it in a big way. Not Robert Harvey––at least when the idea is cover crops. The Guthrie County, Iowa, farmer went all-in on cover crops two years ago, seeding cereal rye on all 1,100 acres he farms with his father, Gerald.

Control water levels and nitrogen with tile systems

Nitrate management in tile water is a big reason why this water control structure has slowly gained a foothold in the Corn Belt, but its potential for providing timely water to corn and soybeans may spell the future for this underground tile water management tool.

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