F.I.R.S.T. harvest results yields top-nine finish for Poncho 250

Poncho® 250 seed-applied insecticide has topped the charts in one specific field test in west-central Illinois.

F.I.R.S.T. ® results show remarkable yields, ranging from 225.3 to 235.6 bushels per acre, for Poncho 250.

“Poncho 250, as well as Poncho 1250, helps maximize yield potential by delivering superior seed protection,” says Kerry Grossweiler, Bayer CropScience product manager.

The results also are impressive, due to weather conditions during this year’s growing season and crop rotation from previous years.

The grower saw an inch of rain the week of planting and one week prior to harvest. But, during the growing season rain came in minimal amounts, only tenths at a time.

“Poncho helps increase plant vigor,” Grossweiler says. “It works to make the plant and the root system more aggressive and healthy, and, therefore, it’s able to continue growing even with a lack of moisture.”

Also, the field has been planted consecutively with corn for five years. This offers a prime location for pest carryover from one season to the next, unless growers have the right protection.

“The tested hybrids are genetically resistant to corn rootworm, but Poncho 250 protects against early season pests that genetic Bt doesn’t provide on its own,” Grossweiler says. “It also provides protection against black cutworms, wireworms, white grubs, seed corn maggots, grape colaspis, flea beetles, chinch bugs, and other corn seed and seedling insect pests.”

Be sure to reserve Poncho 250 this fall for a championship season in 2008.

For more information, visit www.BayerGrowingStrong.com. Growers also can contact their local Bayer CropScience representative or call 1-866-99-BAYER (1-866-992-2937).

©2007 Bayer CropScience LP, 2 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Always read and follow label instructions

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