They're gunning for Ben Moore in northwest Tennessee. No, he's not in any trouble. It's just a friendly game of MarketMaxx with his grower neighbors.

Moore was a winner in the 2006 MarketMaxx game from The Corn And Soybean Digest. And after introducing several other farmers to the corn and soybean marketing games, he now has some “local” competition.

He and his competitors all signed up for the games at www.MarketMaxx.net. You, too, can become a player in a fun and educational contest that can help you master corn and soybean marketing skills and give you an opportunity to win some big prizes.

Moore, 29, farms about 1,500 acres each of corn and soybeans at Dresden, TN. He got started playing MarketMaxx in 2005 and even led in the corn marketing contest for a while last year.

Once the last of his simulated 100,000 bu. of corn and 50,000 bu. of soybeans were marketed in the MarketMaxx contest, his overall corn price of $3.26.24/bu. placed him fourth among some 5,000 players.

Fourth place in the soybean marketing contest was Kevin Hull, 45, Hallsville, MO. He sold his 50,000 bu. of beans for $6.52.66/bu. “I had hedged crops before,” says Hull, “and MarketMaxx challenged me because I didn't have a lot of time. The game was interesting and kept me busy in wee hours of the morning.”

Hull and Moore both were winners of a high-speed Internet system from Agristar Global Networks. And both are active in MarketMaxx 2007.

More than 6,400 players are involved in this year's MarketMaxx games. Along with improving their marketing skills, they also have a chance to win the grand prizes of an AGCO Gleaner R5 or A5 series combine (not to exceed 100 combine separator hours) in the corn contest, or an AGCO RT or DT tractor (not to exceed 250 hours) in the soybean contest.

Second place prize for each category is a complete computer system including software from Syngenta Crop Protection. Along with AGCO Gleaner, AGCO Tractors and Syngenta Crop Protection, Cargill Certified SolutionPro is also a MarketMaxx 2007 sponsor.

Deadline for signing up at www.MarketMaxx.net is May 31. After then, registered players will continue to receive the bi-weekly MarketMaxx e-newsletter that tracks the contest's corn and soybean leader boards. It also features market commentary from Al Kluis of Northland Commodities, Minneapolis, MN, as well as timely news that can impact corn and soybean markets.

Moore says MarketMaxx helped him feel more comfortable in using options. “I actually used more puts and calls in my real use grain marketing after playing the game,” he says. “Since there is no risk involved (unlike actual options and futures trades), it let me experiment more in an inexpensive way.

“Now I've gotten more of my neighbors involved in MarketMaxx. They're all out there gunning for me,” he says.

To learn more about how you can gain from being a MarketMaxx player, go to www.MarketMaxx.net and get signed up. You can then make corn and soybean trades using your simulated allotments of 100,000 bu. of corn and 50,000 bu. of soybeans from now through Oct. 31, when the game ends.

You may just be awarded the keys to a new combine or tractor. And you'll probably be a much better marketer.