Baking with Soy in the American Kitchen is the third in an ongoing series of soy foods cookbooks.

"Baked goods are a wonderful way to introduce soy to the average family," said Barbara Klein, editor of the book and co-director of the Center. "Not only does adding soy improve the nutrient content of breads and desserts without changing their flavor, it can actually enhance the final product. Soy helps baked goods brown nicely and allows them to retain moisture so they stay fresh longer."

She points out that, while substituting soy flour for some of the wheat flour in a recipe is a simple way to bake with soy, there are many other easy-to-use soy products that can be used in baking, such as soy protein isolate, soy milk, tofu, textured soy protein, soy nuts, and soy analogs.

"The amount of soy flour that can be added to a baked product depends on whether it is yeast-leavened, such as in dinner rolls or whole wheat bread, or is quick-leavened with baking powder or baking soda, such as in cakes and cookies," Klein said. "Replacing about 15% of the wheat flour with soy flour in a yeast bread recipe gives a nutty flavor, darker crust, and moister crumbs."

Klein further notes that soy protein isolate can generally be substituted for wheat flour in cooking at the same or slightly smaller proportions as soy flour.

The book can be ordered at a price of $15/copy by calling 217-244-1706. Additional information, sample recipes, and an online order form for the cookbook and the other titles in the series, Tofu in the American Kitchen and Textured Vegetable Protein in the American Kitchen, are also available on the Internet at www.soyfoodsillinois.uiuc.edu.