How much corn will you plant in 2014?

Now that growers are reviewing production and yield data from 2013, and managing volatile corn prices, planting intentions are being pondered. We'd like to know: What percentage of your acreage will be planted to corn in 2014? Will all of your acres be in corn? Half of them? Or, will you possibly plant only soybeans? Take our poll and let us know. As always, feel free to leave comments with your planting intentions and your location.

Discuss this poll 36

Anonymous
on Jan 8, 2014

Growing corn on our farm will still be profitable, but we'll take a closer watch on costs and productivity. Squeezing higher yields will come from better managing micronutrients that have given us a 10 bushel increase bump, healthy root systems, and larger ears.

Anonymous
on Jan 8, 2014

Growing corn on our farm will still be profitable, but we'll take a closer watch on costs and productivity. Squeezing higher yields will come from better managing micronutrients that have given us a 10 bushel increase bump, healthy root systems, and larger ears.

Anonymous
on Jan 8, 2014

Year in and year out a 50-50 mix of corn and soybeans works best.

Anonymous
on Jan 8, 2014

we are 50/50 rotation 1500 corn 1500 soy south central nebr

Anonymous
on Jan 3, 2014

300acres of beans 250acres of corn michigan

Anonymous
on Jan 1, 2014

going to alfalfa

Anonymous
on Dec 30, 2013

I have always been 50/50 but with no profts in sight for corn and I can still contract a profit in soybeans, why plant a corn crop and loose money on it like this year? Have fun finding corn supplies next year. then again if acrage slips, maybe the price will go up? Then again, actual supply means nothing anymore in this manipulated market place.

Anonymous
on Dec 21, 2013

I am trying to buy more row crop acrage but smaller tracts in mid missouri are hard to come by. I'm trying to purchase 63acres now and have 6-10 acres in corn and the remain in beans.Can farmers actually pay for a retirement farm these days?

Anonymous
on Dec 18, 2013

It's none of your business!!

Anonymous
on Dec 18, 2013

Pulling out 500 acres of corn and putting it in cotton.

Anonymous
on Dec 14, 2013

we always rotate.

Anonymous
on Dec 14, 2013

we always rotate.

Anonymous
on Dec 14, 2013

Corn makes no sense at $4.00 when beans are $12.00

Anonymous
on Dec 14, 2013

We'll replace barley acres with ad'l corn; we're needing to add organic matter back into some acres with corn. Soybean acres will be reduced 50% to make way for the ad'l corn acres. This move should get us back to a 50-50 corn-soybean rotation.

Anonymous
on Dec 14, 2013

West Central Ohio, will stay 50/50

Anonymous
on Dec 11, 2013

1/3 will be corn, 2/3 hay...Beef cows and calves like corn silage and baled hay!

Anonymous
on Dec 10, 2013

Typically plant 60-40 corn soybean will go to 50-50 beans on beans don't work about 10-15 percent yield reduction

Anonymous
on Dec 9, 2013

Yankton sd

Anonymous
on Dec 9, 2013

100% of my acres, Greenville Wi

Anonymous
on Dec 8, 2013

Planning on planting more corn(some corn on corn) then soybeans. What I am not planning on is probably not making a profit on either.

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

dewing normal rotation

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

equalizing acres between corn and soybeans 50/50 with some corn on corn

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

100% no-till, 4-6 different crops, western SD

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

I stay with a 50/50 rotation of corn and soybeans. Think about soil health, weed control, insect control, etc, etc, etc.

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

sold 100 percent 2014 quite awhile ago.
was taught corn in a supply disrupted year will peak prior to harvest.
September 2012

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

half is the onjly way to go

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

Dependent on what the insurance prices end up being in February. I usually am 1000 ac of Corn and 1000 ac of soybeans. But with these prices soybeans are much more profitable.

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

We farm half way between Peoria, Illinois and Moline, Illinoins in a straight line.

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

I don't know yet since still negotiating cash rents and have to "rebid" on some acres....

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

Northeast Indiana, we run 50/50 every year. Rotate crops,chemicals and other inputs helps against getting resistant weeds and bugs.

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

My current plan is 50/50, but if corn prices don't improve I will need to see how to cut costs! More soybean acres may be an option, reduced populations, reduced fertilizer, lower cost insurance options,etc.

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

ps; only had 43 ac; corn 2012 ! only own & rent 1,600 plus acres! planted 600 plus wheat ! 1,000 plus soys ! only averaged 5% of acres to corn in 5 years! ( theres no $ in corn ; vs; Inputs & only farm 12 miles from a major ethanol plant & 100 % class A roads to get there !corn cannot compete @ todays input costs! & 2012 soybeans were bset ever in the major drought of 2012 ! ( also I have ON FARM DRYING & STORAGE & THE BEST ! UTILITIES! 3 PHASE & NATURAL GAS ! PS; AGAIN CORN IS A "LOSER" @ 350% INPUT $ OF 2005! )

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

We are reducing our irrigated corn acres on the wells that have dropped on their pumping ability. We plan on more feed acres to help reduce expenses. Land & rent values went too far for any return, with the drop in commodity prices.

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

None

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

None

Anonymous
on Dec 7, 2013

we adhere to our normak crop rotation with little regard for yearly fluctuations. Planting corn on corn consistantly ends up costing us more to produce.

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