A new study by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) confirms corn-ethanol additives in gasoline have helped clear the air, ground and water.

The EPA study looks at the success of clean-fuels programs implemented by the agency, including the replacement of MTBE with ethanol. MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) has been a cause for concern because of groundwater contamination.

According to the study, these programs exceeded expectations in reducing ozone pollutants and air toxins, and the research found that emission reductions were often significantly greater than regulatory requirements.

In 1996, about 11% of the reformulated gas sold contained ethanol, while virtually all the remainder contained MTBE. By 2005, the ethanol share increased to about 53%, with corresponding decreases in MTBE.

To see the full report, check out: www.epa.gov/otaq/regs/fuels/rfg/properf/rfgperf.htm.