The National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) rejects the conclusion of Benbrook Consulting Services that claims that corn developed with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has hurt, rather than helped, U.S. farm income.

“U.S. corn producers are very attuned to costs and revenues and the bottom line. About 18% of corn farmers in the U.S. chose to plant Bt corn this past year,” says farmer Leon Corzine, chairman of the NCGA biotech working group. “It is ridiculous and downright insulting to assume that we would make that decision without having clearly weighed the costs and benefits.”

NCGA's “Know Before You Grow” program, available at its Web site (www.ncga.com), helps farmers decide whether to use biotech hybrids, Corzine says.

“Individual farmers decide whether it makes sense in their operations,” he says. “It is not appropriate nor effective in all corn production situations.”

To read the report, called When Does It Pay To Plant Bt Corn? visit www.iatp.org.