“You Don’t Clock In And Out In Agriculture”

This is a great quote I heard at the Young Farmer and Rancher Institute sponsored by American AgCredit and Farm Credit Services of the Southwest. When you get the older and younger generations in the same room, you get some interesting quotes.

What can be said about the title of this column? Well, one of the reasons why people select agriculture as their career is that there is no set schedule. It is 24-7, 365 days a year. What’s attractive about this arrangement is that if you want to attend a child’s activity or catch a few hours of hunting you don’t have to punch the time clock.

Agriculture today is a knowledge business; it’s analyzing the financial and marketing plan for optimal profits or networking with others for the betterment of the industry or your business.

The downside can be that occasionally you need a time out. That one-day vacation per year or the three-day weekend can add extra zip to your business decision-making. Taking time to visit five other successful businesses per year or having a little rest and relaxation can be the recipe for balance, which leads to sustainability.

No, you don’t clock in and out in agriculture and in many cases small business and professional jobs. They key is when you are working, are you productive or just keeping busy? We don’t clock in, but when we do, we should be either creating or executing the strategies that improve ourselves and those around us.

The Road Warrior of Agriculture

My e-mail address is:sullylab@vt.edu

Editors' note: Dave Kohl, The Corn and Soybean Digest Trends Editor, is an ag economist specializing in business management and ag finance. He recently retired from Virginia Tech, but continues to conduct applied research and travel extensively in the U.S. and Canada, teaching ag and banking seminars and speaking to producer and agribusiness groups.

To see Dave Kohl's previous road warrior adventures type Dave Kohl in the Search blank at the top of the page.

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