Newton’s Laws

I discussed some new year’s resolutions that you might want to consider in my first column of 2005. One was the balance between mental, physical and spiritual health with goals in each. That article was a great backdrop to this week’s article.

My former administrative assistant, Barbara Newton, was just featured on the Roanoke Times front page. She had lost 45 pounds on a 5’3” frame and was named outstanding MBA student at Radford University as well. She came up with some positive and negative Newton’s Laws that are applicable to weight loss, but to life as well.

Newton’s Laws – Positives

  • Take small steps when working toward goals.
  • It’s not doing one thing 1,000% better, but doing 1,000 little things 1% better.
  • Hire the right trainer or coach.
  • Match your personalities.
  • Reward yourself along the way.
  • Give yourself a treat occasionally.
  • Moderation and balance are essential.
  • Do not deny yourself food, but just limit your food intake.
  • Drink water: It used to be free!
  • It is especially critical for women to keep sodium low.
  • Keep moving.
  • You do not have to be a runner. Walking or doing something to burn off calories works also.


Newton’s Laws – Negatives

  • Family members and others who zap your energy and are their own worst problems – get them out of your life.
  • Procrastination. Just get started and take little chunks of a big task one at a time. Celebrate each small accomplishment.
  • People that are into themselves. You will grow if you help other people grow and develop.
  • I can’t afford it! Well, sometimes you have to invest in yourself. If you don’t have your health, then you don’t have much.
  • It takes time. There is no magic pill or solution, whether it is a family business challenge, losing weight or quitting smoking. It takes 21 days to begin to change a habit!


My e-mail address is:sullylab@vt.edu

Editors' note: Dave Kohl, The Corn and Soybean Digest Trends Editor, is an ag economist specializing in business management and ag finance. He recently retired from Virginia Tech, but continues to conduct applied research and travel extensively in the U.S. and Canada, teaching ag and banking seminars and speaking to producer and agribusiness groups.

To see Dave Kohl's previous road warrior adventures type Dave Kohl in the Search blank at the top of the page.

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