As soyfoods continue to gain popularity, a sea of information grows. Much of it is accessible via the Internet.

But so much data is available that sorting through the results of a simple search can be a monumental task. For example, given the word "soyfoods," the Alta Vista search engine pulls up over 1,800 documents. It could take hours to decipher which sites are even worth a hit.

Eventually, you'll find soyfoods.com, which probably is the most comprehensive soyfoods Web site.

Published by the Indiana Soybean Board, this U.S. Soyfoods Directory site contains everything from basic information on soy products to abstracts of recent research projects around the world. And there are multiple links provided for each topic.

If what you're looking for isn't within this site, there's bound to be a link to it.

Major features of the site include:

* Soyfoods descriptions detailing over 25 soy products. Cost comparisons are included. Links to recipes and information on buying, storage, usage and nutrition are available on many items.

* Soyfood companies - over 250 in the U.S. - that produce or distribute soyfoods. This search allows you to look for foods by a specific type, brand name, company name or state. A listing of soyfood mail-order links has also been added.

* Recipes. They're listed under the type of soy product they utilize.

The "quick starters" link provides soy options that take only minimal preparation. Nutrition information for each recipe is also provided.

* Nutrition information for common products, including a soymilk calcium chart that covers the major soy beverage brands. An isoflavone link provides several articles detailing their benefits and concentrations in soyfoods.

There is even a link to the USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference - where you can find further soyfood nutrient facts and figures.

* Research abstracts and presentation links from the International Symposium On The Role Of Soy In Preventing And Treating Chronic Disease, held in Brussels, Belgium.

Recently, presentations from the American Dietetic Association annual meeting and the second annual Soyfoods Symposium in Louisville, KY, have been added.

* A listing of scientists from around the world who study soyfoods. Email addresses are included for some.

* Books that offer information on soy and preparing soyfoods.

* A free monthly newsletter with soy news updates and recipes sent to your email.

* Links to other soyfood resources and industry associations. The Soy Protein Council, American Soybean Association, United Soybean Board (USB) and many state associations are part of the listing.

The links page also contains a link to "Ask An Expert" on the Stratsoy Web site (www.ag.uiuc. edu/~stratsoy), managed by USB. Using this link, you can get answers to specific soyfood questions from Clare Hasler, executive director of the Functional Food for Health Program at the University of Illinois.

If you don't have Internet access, you can get a printed copy of the U.S. Soyfoods Directory by calling 1-800-TALKSOY.