The American Soybean Association (ASA) is pleased that the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has approved five value-added soy protein products for use in Food for Peace programs.

The decision is based on extensive nutritional information provided by the World Initiative for Soy in Human Health (WISHH) program, which is supported by ASA, the United Soybean Board and state soybean organizations. USAID's approval will allow food assistance groups, such as Africare and the World Food Programme, to request defatted soy flour, textured soy protein, soy protein concentrates, isolated soy protein and soy milk replacer through the $1 billion Food for Peace Program administered by USAID.

Lauren Landis, director of the USAID Office of Food for Peace, notified ASA of the decision and specifically cited defatted soy flour for being economical and practical for use in USAID's work in developing countries throughout the world.

"USAID's decision creates new opportunities for U.S. soy to help fight the global battle against hunger," says ASA First Vice President Dwain Ford, an Illinois soybean farmer. "Furthermore, the Food for Peace program can help foster long-term commercial customers for U.S. soy. Some of our leading export markets, like the Philippines and South Korea, are proof that U.S. food assistance can also build trade relationships."

"Groups that deliver food aid applaud this decision since it offers them new tools to combat global malnutrition that affects more than 800 million people, including 200 million children under age five," says Ellen Levinson, of Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft, who serves as executive director of the Coalition for Food Aid. "Soy protein is a valuable resource for nonprofit voluntary organizations and cooperatives in their efforts to improve the quality of the food supply in developing countries."