All the positive press that soy has been getting these days has more people searching the shelves for soyfood products - and easier ways to use them.

"People need to see how easily and tastefully these foods fit into today's hurried lifestyle," says Susan Spector, a New York nutritionist.

One way to do that is to page through some of the following soyfoods resources. These cookbooks, a soyfoods directory and mail-order sources may have the answers soy novices are seeking.

Admittedly, many soy cookbooks contain recipes that lean toward gourmet cuisine. However, several books are available that give alternative recipes for old standbys.

Peter Golbitz's Tofu & Soyfoods Cookery offers lots of good information. It includes: a history of soyfoods, storage tips, health impacts of soy, soyfood nutrient tables, a mail-order company list and, of course, recipes.

The instructions provided range from the basics of cooking soybeans and growing sprouts to making dinner rolls, "egg" salad and even chocolate chip cookies. Most of the recipes are standard, everyday fare. The 173-page book is available from Book Publishing Co., 800-695-2241, for $12.95.

Cancer survivor Mike Milken and chef Beth Ginsberg co-authored The Taste For Living Cookbook, featuring Milken's "favorite recipes for fighting cancer." This book is full of healthy recipes - although not all of them use soy.

Once again, most of the recipes are relatively basic. Recipes with soy substitutions for Reubens, lasagna, devil's "fool" cake and cheesecake top the list.

These recipes are designed for quick preparation, with estimated preparation times included. The hardcover, 117-page book retails for $27.50. To order, call 877-884-LIFE.

Other cookbooks to consider: The New Soy Cookbook by Lorna Sass (120 pages, $17.95), The Whole Soy Cookbook by Patricia Greenberg (240 pages, $16.00) and The Complete Soy Cookbook by Paulette Mitchell (270 pages, $17.95). All explain the basics and beyond. Check the cooking section at your bookstore for these and other titles.

Another excellent resource is the U.S. Soyfoods Directory, published by the Indiana Soybean Board (ISB). This booklet features virtually everything you need to know about soyfoods. It includes recipes for various soy products, as well as hints for storing, using and cooking them. A list of soy cookbooks and other resource books is also included.

Once you find recipes, the next challenge is gathering the soy products they call for. But, with the right mail-order sources, there's no need to rack up added mileage.

Some soy products offered via mail: black or yellow soybeans (dried or canned), soy beverage, flour, soynuts, butter, protein powder, shakes and bars, tofu, textured protein, instant yogurt, cheese, and salad dressings.

Apple Valley Natural Foods, Berrien Springs, MI, has a wide selection of these products available. Catalogs are available at 800-BERRIEN.

Harvest Direct, Inc., a Knoxville, TN, mail-order company, also sells a variety of soy products. A special symbol denotes products containing soy, including many ready-to-serve items. The company also offers free samples of soy beverages. (Chill before serving - don't let the smell scare you.) Call 800-835-2867 for a catalog.

The ISB's Soyfoods Directory also has a comprehensive listing of soyfood companies. To get the '99 edition, call 800-TALKSOY or visit online (soyfoods.com).