The second predictor of the CCYP, years in CC, was also strongly correlated with the CCYP. CCYP got worse with each additional year in the CC system through the seventh year, when the study was terminated. This conclusion is at odds with the claims of many Corn Belt farmers who argue that corn yields in CC eventually attain the same level as CS rotations. On average, the CCYP in this study increased by 186% from third-year CC to fifth-year CC and 268% from third-year CC to seventh-year CC.

“Yield reductions resulting from additional years of continuous corn production mirror the effects of residue accumulation when corn is cropped continuously,” says U of I crop Physiologist Fred Below, another co-author. “It is well documented that corn residues introduce a host of physical, chemical and biological effects that negatively influence corn yields.”



Effects of accumulated corn residues include reduced soil temperature, increased soil moisture, reduced N fertilizer availability and production of autotoxic chemicals, all of which can negatively affect growth and future corn crop development.



The final predictor of the CCYP, difference in CC and CS delta yields (the difference between the yield where no N was applied and the maximum yield under non-N limiting conditions), is probably a function of weather conditions, particularly during critical growth periods such as ovule determination and grain fill. Drought and heat can disproportionately reduce yields of the CC system relative to the CS system. This principle was demonstrated during the 2012 drought, when farmers reported yield reductions as large as 50 bu./acre for CC systems compared to CS. Based on this study, the authors concluded that the CCYP persists for at least seven years. However, during very favorable growing seasons, increased N rates can overcome the CCYP.

Unfortunately, higher N rates do not eliminate the CCYP during average or poor growing seasons. This study concluded that the primary causes of the CCYP are: N availability, corn stover accumulation and unfavorable weather.



“Given that weather cannot be controlled, and the optimum N fertilizer rate can be determined only after crop harvest, managing corn stover has the greatest potential for reducing the CCYP,” says Gentry. The same research team is collaborating on a follow-up study investigating the effect of stover removal and tillage on the CCYP.

Identifying Factors Controlling the Continuous Corn Yield Penalty” was published in the January 2013 issue of Agronomy Journal (105:295-303). It is an open-access article.

 

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